Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Redmond Rock

What is the difference between Redmond Rock and the other colorful trace mineral blocks on the market?

There is a big difference: Redmond Rock was 100% created by mother nature long before the dinosaurs; The pink color, the 63 minerals and elements, even how it was pressed – all of it carried out by nature; Redmond Rock uses no artificially added coloring (“Mommy, why is the salt blue?”), no binders, contains 10 times more minerals than the 6-or-so minerals that most blocks contain, lasts longer in the rain, and most of the time, horses prefer it over other blocks.

How long does Redmond Rock last?

That all depends on your horse. If your horse is in need of salt and minerals, chances are good that they are going to eat a significant amount of Redmond Rock before their body reaches a level of healthy maintenance. On average, a 9 lb Redmond Rock will last a horse about 3 months.

How well does Redmond Rock hold up in the weather?

Redmond Rock is a very dense product. Mother Nature has placed it under extreme underground pressure since before the dinosaurs. Though Redmond Rock is soluble, it holds up to rain much better than the manufactured, pressed blocks.

Can my horse overeat on Redmond Rock?

Yes, and no. You will notice that we say on the label, “Provide fresh, clean water at all times.” This is for good reason. Many horses eat a lot of Redmond Rock when they first see it. You will notice that their first stop after spending some licking time on the Rock is at the water trough. Water is how the horse balances their sodium and mineral intake. Without access to water, your horse will run into trouble, and not just from eating salt.

What if my horse won't eat Redmond Rock?

Sometimes this happens. We can’t diagnose why with all horses. Here are a few possible reasons: 1) Perhaps your horse just doesn’t like licking on things; 2) Perhaps your horse is getting enough salt and minerals from another mineral source; 3) Perhaps your forage is exceptional to the point that it is providing the minerals that your horse needs.

Is Redmond Rock the same as Himalayan Rock?

Nope. Did you know that Redmond Rock is mined, sorted and packaged right here in the USA? We kind-of like that. Redmond Rock contains around 7% mineral content compared to around 3% that most Pakistan mined Himalayan rock contains.

What's the difference between Redmond Rock® and Real Salt® sea salt?

How is Redmond Rock and Real Salt different? Well, they both come from the same pre-dinosaur underground salt deposit. They both contain over 60 trace minerals. The difference is that the Redmond Rock and Real Salt are sourced from different parts of the mine. Because the strata in the mine is sitting vertical, we can actually see the different veins of salt and select which veins we want to use for which product. Notice the vertical lines in the picture below. The whiter veins would be Real Salt-type quality. The darker veins could be used for Redmond Rock. The dark and light veins have the same number of minerals, but a different percentage of minerals. So, Real Salt will be 95-97% Sodium chloride, while Redmond Rock will be 93-97% sodium chloride. Redmond Rock would be a little on the gritty side for most people to enjoy as food salt.

Is Redmond Rock® safe to use for sheep?

Many wonder about the copper levels in Redmond Rock and whether it is safe to use for sheep. The mineral analysis shows 3ppm copper in the Redmond Rock and it doesn’t show a maximum. Over the decades that we have been tested the minerals in this product, the lab results have consistently come back at 3ppm copper and not showing a maximum.  

Also, people have been feeding Redmond Rock to sheep for decades with terrific results.  There is no concern of copper toxicity from feeding Redmond Rock to sheep.  We in fact have a mineral supplement for sheep that is fortified with 300 ppm copper.  At that level, sheep come close to the minimum daily requirement for copper for a 140 lb ewe, which is 5.3 mg copper per day.  

Your sheep will be safe eating Redmond Rock and they will be healthier for doing so.

Daily Gold

How long will a jar of Daily Gold last one horse?

For horses that are working at an average level, feed 2 ounces per horse per day. Given that the Daily Gold contains 72 ounces of product, one bag should last one horse 36 days.

What is the difference between Daily Red and Daily Gold?

Daily Red and Daily Gold are different in more ways than name. Daily Gold is a montmorillonite clay that contains 68 minerals and 3% sodium chloride. Daily Red contains 93% sodium chloride and 7% minerals. Daily Gold serves to balance digestive system ph, fortify the animal with 68 minerals, draw out feed molds and allergens, and soothe ulcers, helping them to heal. With 63 different elements, Daily Red serves as a valuable electrolyte and mineral replacer.

Should I feed Daily Red and Daily Gold at the same time?

Because Daily Red and Daily Gold are different products, serving different functions, feeding them at the same time is fine, even encouraged. These products complement each other nicely.

If I feed Daily Gold and other mineral supplementation, am I over supplementing?

Because Daily Gold provides a broad spectrum of minerals (68 to be exact) in trace amounts, it is safe to feed with other supplements. Daily Gold helps to fill in the gaps where other supplements cannot – most mineral supplements contain up to 12 minerals.

What is Daily Gold?

Daily Gold is a completely natural montmorillonite clay that contains 68 minerals and 3% sodium chloride. These same 68 elements are found in the tissues of animals and people – they are the building blocks of life. This montmorillonite clay was born in the depths of an active volcano and when the volcano erupted, came out as volcanic ash that settled into an ancient sea.

What does Daily Gold do for my horse?

Daily Gold serves to balance digestive system ph, fortify the animal with 68 minerals, draw out feed molds and allergens, soothe ulcers – helping them to heal and improve feed digestion efficiency. Many horse owners report that their horse is more relaxed yet energetic when competing.

Does Daily Gold have all the necessary vitamins and minerals a horse needs?

This is a great question. Here’s some food for thought. First, what are all of the minerals a horse needs? Research shows nearly seventy different elements make up the tissues of animals and humans. We ask, which of those elements/minerals are not needed? It makes sense to us that all of those elements/minerals are necessary and that they work together in a complicated synergy that builds robust life. That’s why we love Redmond products so much. Remember that Daily Gold naturally contains sixty-eight elements/minerals that are found in the tissues of animals. Daily Red Contains sixty-three. That’s getting really close to supplying all of the minerals that a horse needs. The question becomes the mineral health of your horse. Is your soil, feed and horse deficient in some element that needs to be supplemented at a fortified level? Redmond Daily Gold and Red do a good job at helping keep animals well balanced in the broad spectrum of minerals. If you horse is significantly deficient in some mineral, a specialized mineral additive might be needed. Neither the Red or Gold provide vitamins.

Will Daily Gold interfere with other supplements?

There are many university research projects with mice, rats, Poultry, Swine and other small animals that when feed Montmorillonite clay (Dairy Gold is such a clay), that health is increased, rate of gain improves, that bone growth and density increases. This all points to good mineralization.

Redmond just worked in conjunction with a group in Mongolia that had Veterinarians over see animals feed the Daily Gold clay and they noted improvement in the hair quality with better shine, color, and hair structure.

The Clay was fed to sheep. goats, horses, camels, and cattle. We recently shipped many cargo containers of Redmond Salt and Clay.

In my study of Montmorillonite clay, I have learned that it is a catalyst to make more minerals available than its own mineral. This means that it frees up minerals in the hay and grains that are not normally useable to the animal become released and available when the clay is fed. Hay is an example. The calcium in hay is high but 60% of that calcium is tied up in the lignant/fiber. The body cannot use it. I am quite confident that the high cat ion exchange of the clay release some or all of that tied up calcium. http://gsabulletin.gsapubs.org/content/70/6/749

Daily Red

What is Daily Red?

Daily Red is a granular version of ancient ocean water that comes from an ancient sea bed deposit deep within the earth in central Utah. Here’s a link that gives you a quick look at where Daily Red comes from: http://www.americasheartland.org/episodes/episode_506/salt_of_the_earth.htm

How long will a jar of Daily Gold last one horse?

If your horse has an average level of activity, the recommended 2 ounce per day feeding rate would stretch your 5lb pouch of Daily Red out 80 days.

What is the difference between Daily Red and Daily Gold?

Daily Red and Daily Gold are different in more ways than name. Daily Gold is a montmorillonite clay that contains 68 minerals and 3% sodium chloride. Daily Red contains 93% sodium chloride and 7% minerals. Daily Gold serves to balance digestive system ph, fortify the animal with 68 minerals, draw out feed molds and allergens, and soothe ulcers, helping them to heal. With 63 different elements, Daily Red serves as a valuable electrolyte and mineral replacer.

Does Daily Red have all the necessary vitamins and minerals a horse needs?

This is a great question. Here’s some food for thought. First, what are all of the minerals a horse needs? Research shows nearly seventy different elements make up the tissues of animals and humans. We ask, which of those elements/minerals are not needed? It makes sense to us that all of those elements/minerals are necessary and that they work together in a complicated synergy that builds robust life. That’s why we love Redmond products so much. Remember that Daily Gold naturally contains sixty-eight elements/minerals that are found in the tissues of animals. Daily Red Contains sixty-three. That’s getting really close to supplying all of the minerals that a horse needs. The question becomes the mineral health of your horse. Is your soil, feed and horse deficient in some element that needs to be supplemented at a fortified level? Redmond Daily Gold and Red do a good job at helping keep animals well balanced in the broad spectrum of minerals. If you horse is significantly deficient in some mineral, a specialized mineral additive might be needed. Neither the Red or Gold provide vitamins.

What do you think about using this product in a free-choice fashion? And, do you think the mineral concentrations would work for horses on grass (little or no alfalfa)?

It sounds like your horses are eating the way nature intended.  Because you are feeding them this way, many problems will be eliminated and the need for supplementation is certainly reduced.  Salt and minerals deplete rapidly as your horses work, urinate and burn electrolytes – the white crust on your horse where the saddle blanets have rested is salt and minerals from sweating.  That is salt and minerals that needs to be replaced.  The good thing about horses is they are able to determine the amount of salt they need and eat the appropriate amount from a free choice setting and this works really well as long as there is fresh water available to help the horse regulate their salt and mineral intake.

With that, we feel great in recommending Daily Red in a free choice setting.  They will be getting the salt they need along with more than 60 different minerals that are naturally occurring in Daily Red and in your horses’ body.

First Aid

How do I apply First Aid?

If possible, rinse any dirt and debris from the wound. Once dry, layer First Aid on 1/4 – 1/2 inch thick. Mound First Aid up over the wound and taper the clay toward the edges. This helps to seal the wound and keep the clay in place.

Should you wrap the wound?

Yes, if possible. It is best to cover First Aid with gauze then wrap the wound with vet wrap. This helps to keep First Aid close to the wound, keep the clay hydrated and protects the wound from bumping and further injury. In reality wrapping the wound on your horse is not always feasible. In these cases, simply apply First Aid, and, as it dries and with the natural movement of the horse, much of the First Aid will eventually sluff off. This is okay. Don’t worry about leaving a little dry residue, simply reapply more First Aid over the top.

What if my horse licks First Aid off?

First aid is completely natural. If your horse eats it, all the better. We eat it too – it is not only safe, it is very good for your horse. With all of the minerals, detoxifying effects and pH balancing ability, it would probably be good if your horse ate a little everyday.

How long should First Aid be left in place?

If First Aid is applied without being wrapped, odds are good that it will stay in place for an hour-or-two and then naturally sluff off due to drying and the horses movement. This is okay. We recommend reapplying First Aid twice a day to aid in the healing process. If First Aid is applied with a wrap, you will want to change the bandage and clay daily. If you find the clay is drawing out all kinds of interesting infection (don’t be surprised when this happens), you will want to change the bandage and reapply First Aid 2-3 times a day until the infection disappears. This allows the wound to get air, keeps the wound and bandage clean and provides a fresh charge of First Aid to continue the drawing and healing process.